Insurance When You are Getting Married

Health insurance providers are not created equal. Before a couple is married, the option of sharing coverage is extremely unusual unless one of your insurers offers domestic partner insurance. As you become engaged, if you both have separate insurance it is important to talk about the both of you switching to the better plan once you are married. There are a few factors consider, which include deductibles, co-payments, and the benefits of each separate plan. Marriage is a big step, and it can be done with ease if the two of you settle important decisions such as your health insurance plan before you take the big leap.

Your deductible is the amount you must pay each year to start your policy. Once this payment is made you will be responsible for whatever amount of co-payment your insurance company requires for you to pay for the health expenses that are covered in your particular policy. The amount of co-payments that you will be responsible for is established at the time you agree to your health insurance policy. It is going to be a certain percentage of health expenses; for instance, you pay 10% while your insurer will be paying the other 90%. You and your fiancé should compare both of your plans and figure out which deductible and co-payment plan seems most appropriate for the two of you.

Married couples are usually eligible for certain benefits that unmarried couples are not. Being insured separately by the health care provider sponsored by your employers may no longer be the most beneficial option for you. If you or your fiancé has insurance, and the other does not, once the two of you are married they can be added to the other partner’s plan. Cost of adding an additional person is definitely something that should be examined. You should not be required to pay more for adding a spouse or even a child in the future because most plans are offered to immediate family at no extra cost. The best way to compare policies is to estimate a yearly amount of normal health expenses, emergencies, co-payments, and deductibles. Whichever plan has the lowest cost to you will almost always be the best choice.

In addition to sharing health insurance with your new spouse, you may also want to consider switching the rest of your insurance plans, such as the policies you have for your separate automobiles. This is because most companies will give you a discount on having more than one vehicle insured. You may also be interested in finding a company that can insure you home, automobile, and health in one place. If you carry more than one policy with a company, they will also usually give you some sort of discount on them. It is important to sit down and discuss insurance with your fiancé because the two of you could be saving money and stress by figuring out what decision is best before the time comes.

Health Insurance Limitations

Health insurance often requires a mountain of paperwork that has a lot of fine print. Unfortunately, this means that few people read their plans thoroughly nor do they fully understand what their plan covers or does not cover. Here are some common limitations in health insurance coverage that you should know.

Some of the most shocking health insurance limitations are found in the the fine print holes in the insurance policy. For instance, many people have found that their health insurance did not cover a routine or necessary medical procedure because they did not receive an authorization code prior to the procedure or the hospital did not correctly fill out the paperwork. Your medical claim can be denied simply because the hospital used odd codes for your treatment. While any claims denied by the insurance company can be disputed, this process is not only tedious, but time-consuming and draining, especially for someone who is already ill. There is also little success in winning disputed claims, which makes this option rather limiting.

Another surprising health insurance limitation happens more often than people realize. Imagine this situation: you are diagnosed with a medical condition and need an operation. You research surgeons and hospitals within your plan. You understand your plan’s coverage of hospital care. You have your operation and then you find a massive medical bill in the mail. Apparently your health insurance did not cover the anesthesiologist or other specialists that may have consulted in your operation. Thus, you have to pay these specialists for their services, even though you were under the impression that your plan would cover these costs associated with the surgery. Such a bill can be in the thousands of dollars, and there is little you can do to dispute the charges. The only way to avoid these charges is to make sure that you ask before the operation who will be involved and ensure that they are covered in your health insurance plans.

Other limitations are put on a number of treatments. For instance, you may need physical therapy or visits to a psychiatrist. Many health insurance plans will put a limit on the number of covered visits for such medical treatment. Without realizing it, you may surpass the maximum visits allowed by your health insurance and end up racking up huge bills.

Many people think that buying health insurance will cover them medically, but this is only correct to a point. When securing insurance, you should read through your health insurance package carefully, and when you are about to undergo any expensive medical procedure, be sure to consult your health insurance plan first.

The Importance of Good Records

Keeping your own records of any medical care that you and your immediate family have received is the only way to be sure that your insurance and bills are free from mistakes. It may seem unimportant now, but later in life when you try to get life insurance or get treatment that is appropriate for you, the importance will be in the spotlight. Everything from your allergies to your payment records with medical facilities can hurt you if they are wrong in your report. You could be given improper treatment or even denied treatment at all. By keeping your own records, you can dispute anything that is false.

Would you believe that you could be denied a job because of something erroneous on your medical records? It is true; if you are reported to have a disability, whether it is true or not, you could be turned down. You would be labeled as a risk, especially if the company offers insurance; they would know that you are going to cost more money to employ. The same goes for applying for health insurance where your medical records show that you would require prescription drugs, doctor visits, and increased chance of emergencies. It is quite the ordeal if you do in fact have a disability, but imaging if you did not have one at all-you would be turned down for insurance, while also being completely ineligible for disability financial help.

An example of a mistake that could be made on your record would be a diagnosis error. Perhaps you request that your doctor check a suspicious lump in your breast. On the first visit he may suspect that it is cancer. Most people will get a second opinion or go for a more thorough conclusive examination. If the second doctor decides that it is only a cyst and has it removed, your personal records would show that you are cancer-free. However, if this visit was documented incorrectly, or not at all, you may have trouble getting insured and not know why. If you had a record of the second visit that found the cyst, this situation would be easily disputed and your record would be accurate.

Human error is simply a part of life, even on medical documents. It is important to always keep your own records so that insurance companies get accurate information about you and your health condition. If you are being turned down for insurance and do not know why, you are best advised to be sure that you are not being misrepresented within your medical records. This problem can be cleared up quickly and easily if you are responsible enough to keep your own personal records.

Health Insurance and Retirement

Health insurance for retirees or senior citizens can be confusing, especially with so many options and requirements. However, health insurance is crucial for retirees. As you grow older, your health obviously becomes more of an issue; you may visit the doctor more, need to fill more prescriptions, or even receive in-home care. Before you retire, prepare for health insurance to ensure that you receive the best benefits.

The first step in planning your health insurance coverage in your retirement is to see if your employer offers insurance coverage after you retire. If the company does, you should certainly consider it. Look at the plan, the deductible, and the coverage. Many near-retirees believe that Medicare will cover their medical payments, but this is not always the case. With this sort of coverage, you will most likely receive better health care but at a more expensive cost. As a retiree, you will certainly have a health insurance budget to maintain, and you will have to decide if the cost of your employer’s insurance is too expensive.

If your employer does not offer coverage, Medicare will be an important and integral part of your health insurance if you are 65 years of age or older. Medicare works like traditional health insurance plans in that you have been contributing a small portion of every paycheck you earn into this plan. Once Medicare begins, you will make co-payments for office visits or treatment. Medicare will also cover the expense of certain medical equipment or needs.

However, Medicare did not cover a number of items that are typical of health insurance. The government recently updated Medicare and divided it into three parts: Part A, B, and C. Part A covers hospital care, such as home health care, hospital stays, and hospice care. This part does not require a premium. Part B covers the more routine medical expenses, such as office visits and laboratory tests, while Part C enrolls you into a fee-for-service or managed care plan that reduces your out-of-pocket costs. Despite these different options, Medicare restricts your coverage by not covering certain kinds of care or illnesses and diseases. Thus, there is also Medigap coverage, which helps fill in the gaps in health insurance that Medicare leaves. Medigap coverage differs from state to state and has different payments.

Beyond Medicare and Medigap, there are also long-term care insurance plans that you can buy. You often see these plans advertised on the television at very low prices. These plans can help cover the costs of a nursing home or home health care. With so many different options and limitations, if you are retiring soon, you should take a look at your budget and what you can afford as well as what sort of coverage you feel you will need.

Healthcare for Long-term Patients

Long-term care insurance is not right for everyone. For a small percentage of the population this coverage is an affordable and worthwhile type of insurance. Determining whether or not long-term care insurance is right for you won’t be the only task at hand; looking for scams will also be a concern.

As you get older, the need for assistance in your everyday life increases. Whether it is in-home care or residing in a nursing home for a few months you will most likely need some way to pay for these types of services. In order to maintain long-term care insurance you must pay for them each and every year until death. Many policies are canceled by policyholders that are on fixed incomes and are simply unable to pay for the increasing premiums as they get older. If the only funds you are receiving were those from Social Security or SSI, then it would be wise to not purchase a policy. Also, if you find that every day purchases and paying for utilities makes you stretch your budget to the limit, you probably should stay clear of this policy. This type of policy is only right for someone who has significant assets they want to preserve for their family, remain independent, or just to spare their family the expense of a nursing home bill.

Comparing policies can prove to be difficult because every company is selling a different combination of benefits and coverage. Many companies offer to pay a fixed amount for each day you receive care, while others will cover a percentage of the overall cost of care or supply a specified amount. Beware of these types of policies unless they offer inflation protection. You see, if they do not account for the increasing cost of nursing home costs, then you are stuck with a policy that really does you no good.

Just like a standard healthcare plan, you will have to receive services at designated locations. If you go outside of this network they will simply refuse to pay for any care that you receive. If you have any type of mental disease or nervous disorder then don’t expect many carriers to accept you (the one exception is Alzheimer’s). There are more restrictions in this type of insurance than any other health insurance.

If this type of policy is right for you, please make sure that the company is reputable. There are many individuals who thrive on the fact that not many people will make an informed decision when it comes to purchasing long-term health insurance. Be sure to read the fine print and find out everything you can about the policy before committing to a company and a long-term health insurance plan.